The Best Summer Fruits For Your Babe & How to Prepare Them

watermelon

 


STRAWBERRIES

Why:
This nutrient-rich superfood is loaded with fiber and vitamin C.

Puree it:
Wash strawberries and slice in half. If berries are underripe, steam 3 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Puree for a smooth texture. Freeze in 2-ounce portions for up to three months.

Smash it: Follow cooking and freezing steps above but instead of pureeing, mash the fruit with a potato masher. Or dice and serve as finger food.

Mix it with:
Bananas, pears, peaches, pears, apples

 

 

PEACHES

Why: This luscious fruit packs lots of calcium, vitamin A, and potassium.

Puree it: Wash, peel, pit, and dice peaches. If peaches are underripe, fill a medium saucepan halfway full with water. Bring water to a boil then reduce heat until the bubbles are very soft. Add peaches and cook 3-5 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Puree for a smooth texture. Freeze in 2-ounce portions for up to three months.

Smash it: Follow cooking and freezing steps above but instead of pureeing, mash the fruit with a potato masher. Or dice and serve as finger food.

Mix it with:
Blueberries, pears, apples, strawberries, cherries, bananas

 

 

BLUEBERRIES, RASPBERRIES & BLACKBERRIES

Why: These brain-boosters are rich in disease-fighting antioxidants.

Puree it: Wash berries. If berries are underripe, steam 3 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Puree for a smooth texture. Freeze in 2-ounce portions for up to three months.

Smash it:
Follow cooking and freezing steps above but instead of pureeing, mash the fruit with a potato masher. Or serve as finger food.

Mix it with:
Peaches, bananas, pears, apples, mangoes

 

 

CHERRIES

Why: This sweet-tart fruit is a powerful source of antioxidants and fiber.

Puree it: Wash cherries, remove pits and slice in half. If cherries are underripe, fill a medium saucepan halfway full with water. Bring water to a boil then reduce heat until the bubbles are very soft. Add cherries and cook 3 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Puree for a smooth texture. Freeze in 2-ounce portions for up to three months.

Smash it:
Follow cooking and freezing steps above but instead of pureeing, mash the fruit with a potato masher. Or slice and serve as finger food.

Mix it with: Apples, pears, peaches, bananas

 

 

WATERMELON

Why: This refreshing fruit is rich in vitamin C and fiber.

Smash it: Mash juicy watermelon with a potato masher or dice and serve as finger food.

Serve it with: Diced peaches, blueberries, pears, apples, or chunks of cheese

 

 

APRICOTS

Why: This tangy fruit is rich in vitamins A and C, as well as fiber.

Puree it: Wash, peel, pit, and dice apricots. If peaches are underripe, fill a medium saucepan halfway full with water. Bring water to a boil then reduce heat until the bubbles are very soft. Add apricots and cook 3-5 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Puree for a smooth texture. Freeze in 2-ounce portions for up to three months.

Smash it: Follow cooking and freezing steps above but instead of pureeing, mash the fruit with a potato masher. Or slice and serve as finger food.

Mix it with: Sweet potatoes, bananas, pears, apples

 

 

CANTALOUPE

Why: This sweet fruit is rich in vitamins A, B6, and C; it’s also a good source of potassium.

Smash it: Mash juicy melon with a potato masher or dice and serve as finger food.

Serve it with: Pears, bananas, blueberries, strawberries, or apples


PLUMS

Why: This fiber-filled fruit is a natural digestion aid for baby.

Puree it: Wash, peel, and dice plums. If plums are underripe, fill a medium saucepan halfway full with water. Bring water to a boil then reduce heat until the bubbles are very soft. Add plums and cook 3-5 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. Puree for a smooth texture. Freeze in 2-ounce portions for up to three months.

Mash it: Follow cooking and freezing steps above but instead of pureeing, mash the fruit with a potato masher. Or slice and serve as finger food.

Serve it with: Pears, bananas, apricots, or apples

 

 

What’s your babe’s fave summer fruit? How do you like to prepare it?

NOTE: Pediatricians have different opinions about when babies should try specific fruits; some, such as strawberries, are more likely to cause an allergic reaction than other fruits. Consult your pediatrician before starting your babe on a new fruit.

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9 thoughts on “The Best Summer Fruits For Your Babe & How to Prepare Them

  1. Our son loves strawberries, blueberries, peaches and cherries (dried only, this year he stopped liking fresh ones).

    Another good fruit you didn’t include is kiwi, which our son also loves. They are full of good stuff.

  2. CaliCat — Kiwi is awesome! Chock full of vitamin C, I lived on the stuff when I was pregnant. It’s not on this list because the peak growing season here in the US is November – February. I’ll definitely have a winter fruit list and kiwi will be on it — stay tuned!

  3. I always do the organic blueberries. I guess blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, etc are sprayed pretty heavily with pesticides. Oh, and I think peaches are the most toxic (in terms of pesticides), which is why I try to buy the organic. Have you found similar info out there?

  4. Just an FYI: There’s been a huge papaya recall. My daughter loves papaya, but it’s best to throw out what you have. The papaya are potentially contaminated with salmonella.

  5. Katie–I would definitely check with your pediatrician. Our doctor gave us the OK for everything but honey, shellfish, and peanuts at 10 months old. But I have friends whose babies started strawberries a lot younger.

    Jill — I always buy organic, just in case.

  6. I love blueberries – we pick a bunch and freeze them for long lasting snacks and lunch treats! Due to allergies, I worry about cantaloupe for my daughter but have been ok with strawberries at 14 months!

  7. Well, it’s past summer here, but we are about to introduce solids for the second time and I can’t remember what we did the first time so this is great!

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